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Another day in the forrest

MUSICIANS from far and wide are converging in Glen Forrest for a day of live acts, barefoot bowls and food trucks as part of the people-powered festival Day in the Forrest.

Glen Forrest Sporting Club venue manager Arusha Flood said since last year’s inaugural festival there had been overwhelming support to continue the event.

“Day in the Forrest 2015 was pulled together with people power and just $150,” she said.

“It is a festival which highlights the power of music, the power of knowing your neighbours and the power of belonging to the hills.

“It is also a celebration and reminder about loving your community and the personalities within it.”

Ms Flood said the festival would also help protect the club’s future.

“Joining us on the day will give local and visiting communities the chance to see what a close-knit club is capable of,” she said.

“It will show visitors the difference in spirit at a club, as opposed to going to a pub or a massive government-funded event.

“We need a future for our club, we need new members, we need respectful and dynamic people to carry on the work which our members have put in over the past 86 years.”

Co-organiser Ben Smeeton said JJJ unearthed wild card Lucas Jones would perform at the festival.

“We have conjured up an unreal line-up of acts from far and wide, who will be split up across two gorgeous stages during the day,” he said.

“Our smaller and more intimate stage, the Grapevine Stage will be a shady sanctuary on a summers day, and our main stage the Magnolia Stage will be set against a backdrop of super old magnolia trees, playing host to our more raucous bands and acts.”

Day in the Forrest will be held at the Glen Forrest Sports Club on December 11. Patrons are encouraged to walk or carpool to the event.

By Sarah Brookes

About Sarah Brookes

Sarah is an award-winning journalist (2016 WA Media Awards - Best Three Suburban Newspaper Stories) who has covered our Mundaring and Kalamunda editions since 2011. She went to Eastern Hills Senior High School before studying chemistry and biology at university. Staring down a microscope two years into her degree she realised a future in science wasn’t for her – journalism was. Sarah lived in Europe before re-settling in Darlington, where her family has lived for three generations, with her two children. She has worked for various government agencies and Media Monitors. Sarah is a media junkie who loves talkback radio and devours the weekend papers.

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