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The Wasteless Pantry owners Amanda Welschbillig and Jeannie Richardson.

Consumers urged to get wasteless

With millions of tones of single use plastic containers going to landfill each year, two award-winning Mundaring business owners are doing their bit to encourage people to ditch the waste for Plastic Free July.

Wasteless Pantry co-owner Jeannie Richardson said it was possible to buy more, for less and help the environment along the way.

“Our philosophy is about less waste which gives people an incentive to buy exactly as much as they need, while it is fresh, which helps everyone’s budget,” she said.

“Within the first four months of opening we have saved around 6,373 plastic shopping bags and 8,681 smaller plastic produce bags from being used and discarded.

“There is a ground swell of people becoming more aware of plastics, decreasing landfill sites and litter in our oceans.”

Ms Richardson said the transition to a wasteless lifestyle was an investment in the future.

“With reusables you still have some impacts in manufacture, transport, storage and initial sale, but then you get to re-fill and enjoy almost endlessly,” she said.

“If your reusable does break the majority of it is fully recyclable over and over again.”

Ms Richardson said package free shopping was suitable for everyone.

“We have had shoppers come in for quantities as small as one teaspoon so they could try an ingredient in a certain recipe,” she said.

“That’s fine because there’s no waste.

“Customers can bring their own containers to the store, or there are recycled donated jars, paper bags and produce bags available.”

During Plastic Free July Ms Richardson and business partner Amanda Welschbillig will host an event at the Midland Courthouse on June 26 from 9am.

The public can learn how to create produce bags, cook simple foods from scratch, create beeswax wrap and meet and hear stories of inspiring people giving up plastic and waste.

About Sarah Brookes

Sarah is an award-winning journalist (2016 WA Media Awards - Best Three Suburban Newspaper Stories) who has covered our Mundaring and Kalamunda editions since 2011. She went to Eastern Hills Senior High School before studying chemistry and biology at university. Staring down a microscope two years into her degree she realised a future in science wasn’t for her – journalism was. Sarah lived in Europe before re-settling in Darlington, where her family has lived for three generations, with her two children. She has worked for various government agencies and Media Monitors. Sarah is a media junkie who loves talkback radio and devours the weekend papers.

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