Home / Front Page Slider / NBN tower invasion

NBN tower invasion

WHILE Herne Hill and Pickering Brook residents rally against plans to build NBN towers next to their homes, investigations by Echo News has discovered more than 20 towers will be rolled out across a host of suburbs in the region.

NBN Co Western Australia corporate affairs manager Philippa Perry said fixed wireless towers, not fibre optic cabling, were proposed for numerous locations in the City of Swan, Shire of Mundaring, and Shire of Kalamunda.

“In Mundaring towers are proposed for Chidlow East, Chidlow North, Parkerville North, Sawyers Valley, Stoneville, South Stoneville, Wooroloo East and Wooroloo West,” she said.

“In the Shire of Kalamunda towers are proposed in Bickley and Pickering Brook while in the City of Swan in Bailup, Bullsbrook, Bullsbrook North, Bullsbrook West, Dayton, Millendon, Gidgegannup, Red Hill, Herne Hill, Brigadoon, South Chittering and Upper Swan.”

In a letter sent by contractors for the NBN Co, Herne Hill and surrounding residents were advised the company was planning to build a 30m tower at the Swan Valley Sporting Club on Great Northern Hwy.

A former Telstra employee, who lives in Herne Hill, who asked to remain anonymous, said the Swan Valley was ‘shafted’ by the proposal to deliver high-speed broadband services.

“Whilst the golden triangle Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane get NBN fibre optic cabling many WA residents are going to get the dreaded tower,” he said.

“This wi-fi technology is useless, especially in cloudy weather or during solar flares which happen more than most people realise.

“Not to mention the fact the health effects haven’t been fully explored yet due to the newness of the technology.”

Last month Kalamunda shire councillors rejected a development application to construct a 50m high NBN tower in Pickering Brook.

Ms Perry said the NBN was currently assessing its options in relation to its next step but remained committed to working with council and the community to deliver the NBN to Pickering Brook.

Pickering Brook resident Geoff Cheong said he was not opposed to the NBN, however residents were strongly against to the location of the fixed wireless tower and its dish.

“In arriving at their decision to locate the tower only 80m from our back door, four other sites were rejected on the basis of visual impact, perceived difficulty in land tenure and vegetation clearing, the effect on short term tourist accommodation and the effect on possible future residential development,” he said.

“Apart from the land tenure and vegetation clearing, most of the reasons used to reject the other sites also apply to the site that was chosen in Pickering Brook.

“Visual impact has a massive effect on the surrounding properties with the tower visible from almost every aspect of the surrounding properties and above the tree line from Pickering Brook Rd.”

Mr Cheong added the World Health Organisation acknowledged more research was needed into the health risks associated with electromagnetic radiation.

“WHO acknowledges more research is required to assess the health risks associated with mobile phone or tablet use, and that any adverse effects, no matter how small, could have major implications for public health around the world,” he said.

Ms Perry said NBN would continue to undertake community consultation for proposed fixed wireless towers that attracted community interest.

“NBN and its delivery partners engage with local residents and councils via letters, emails, meetings, presentations and community information sessions,” she said,

“We have already held community information sessions regarding towers at Parkerville North, Stoneville South, Chidlow North and Wooroloo West and will hold an information session in Herne Hill next week.”

Ms Perry said the NBN would start to become progressively available in these areas from the beginning of next year.

BY SARAH BROOKES

About Sarah Brookes

Sarah is an award-winning journalist (2016 WA Media Awards – Best Three Suburban Newspaper Stories) who has covered our Mundaring and Kalamunda editions since 2011. She went to Eastern Hills Senior High School before studying chemistry and biology at university. Staring down a microscope two years into her degree she realised a future in science wasn’t for her – journalism was. Sarah lived in Europe before re-settling in Darlington, where her family has lived for three generations, with her two children. She has worked for various government agencies and Media Monitors. Sarah is a media junkie who loves talkback radio and devours the weekend papers.

7 comments

  1. Hi Sarah
    Good article. Yes we have one planned for Joseph Rd Gidgegannup too and the properties close to it dont want it either. We will do everything to stop it happening in our back yards.

  2. They are rolling out their unnecessary stop gap measures in high concentrated areas it seems when they could be rolling out fibre instead. Fixed wireless is basically LTE and we all know LTE is insecure by design.

    Just more ways they are cheating people just to avoid fibre. Block these at all costs.

    It requires line of sight so it’s not guaranteed everyone can get it and of course stuck with landline faulty telephones for calls remember and therefore monthly rentals. Delivering you the same faulty service you already have.

    The wireless plan was supposed to be for very long distance and remote areas. They are doing this to block fibre internet , block fibre internet for businesses and the economy because they are economic vandals.

    To think people voted for this.

    • I refer to your statement “To think people voted for this”. Most people do not vote for a party or independent on one policy alone, did you?

  3. AC wifi gives me severe headaches I have to keep it off. Radios are a faulty joke fullstop. If people want fibre they should deserve fibre.

    I very highly doubt all this stuff gets a high standard of testing. They are rushing to get this out to say they have delivered people crap of course.

    Say no to towers. I have a mobile tower at the back of the house across the road and I cannot sleep properly here. If I move to another house I sleep like a log. Only the arrogant would ignore this.

    Remember optic cables work, faulty insecure wireless does not.

    • Maybe your headaches are from stressing too much.

      I really don’t understand the obsession with NBN, sure some businesses could benefit but for the average person, I don’t get it.

      • Hi Elsbrook
        If you have elecromagnetic sensitivity you would get it. I have a friend who has to turn off her gas hot water system and shut the windows when her mother is around. Her mother runs a modem cable 20 metres outside the house because the EMR makes her sick. She has EMS. It is debilitating.
        Yes it services some but destroys others. Good for you but not for me , so why am I punished because of convenience to others?
        Daniel Rossi, is not alone. There are thousands like him but no one is listening.

        • Hello Janette. After reading your comment I did some googling on this subject. It’s an interesting read.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*