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Getting messy with slime is a business for Blayz Meredith of Parkerville who also donates to Parkerville Children and Youth Care. Pictures: CLAIRE OTTAVIANO


WHEN two Parkerville youngsters started making slime in their backyard, no one could have foreseen how their success would also help children and youth in need.

Blayz Meredith, 8, and his step-sister Jorja Trew, 10, are not only taking on the business world with their Slime FX birthday parties but their generosity is making waves at Parkerville Children and Youth Care.

Making slime started as a small way to earn some pocket money but their business unexpectedly drew attention from far and wide making $1000 in its first month and a further $2000 worth of future bookings.

Blayz said he and Jorja spent seven months watching YouTube videos to develop their own slime recipe and later selling their product at community fairs and markets.

“They had a lot of slime failures along the way but here they are now, more successful than they ever thought they would be,” mother Jaylene Curtin said.

“Blayz and his step-sister have paid themselves a very small and humble wage since starting Slime FX as they understand the importance of reinvesting as much as possible back into the business to achieve continued growth.”

Not only are Blayz and Jorja earning some pocket money and some valuable life lessons they have also taken the opportunity to help Parkerville Children and Youth Care by donating one litre of slime for every $200 they make.

Organisation chief executive officer Basil Hanna said it was amazing how something so simple could have such rewarding benefits for children battling trauma.

“Our psychologists and occupational therapists are using the product in various ways with children and youth across all ages,” he said.

Parkerville Children and Youth Care chief executive officer Basil Hanna says it is amazing how something so simple has such rewarding benefits for children battling trauma.

“Often what we find with children who have been through trauma is that the development of their brain can be delayed depending on the age when the trauma occurred and at what developmental stage.

“With the slime we are able to engage with youth, build relationships and trust with fun sensory experiences.”

The centre built its roots in Parkerville in 1903, then known as Parkerville Children’s Home, and has since expanded to provide family support and youth counselling services locally in the Ellenbrook and Midland area and as far as Northam, Bunbury, Geraldton and Carnarvon.

Plans are currently moving forward for the organisation’s new Child Advocacy Centre in Midland to allow for more children, young people and their families to access services in the treatment of trauma from abuse.

The former orphanage holds a special place in Blayz’s heart as his grandfather was an orphan there in 1970.

They have a goal of donating 100 litres of slime.

Ms Curtin said Blayz and Jorja had been raised to appreciate those less fortunate in life and were encouraged to give back where they could.

“They understand that sometimes even the smallest gift or act of kindness can bring immense happiness to another person.”

Find Slime FX on Facebook.

By Claire Ottaviano

About The Editorial Team

Echo News gives readers an alternative to other media outlets in WA and enjoys a very high rate of readership in its distribution area. Our Echo News team are a small group of devoted individuals who work hard to give the local community an easy to read, yet intelligent mix of local community stories.


  1. Samantha Prunster

    I am so very proud of my nephew Blayz and his step sister Jorja. They’ve really taken the world by storm with their slime making business. It certainly helps when they have the support of their peers by the way of Jaylene Curtin and Warwick Trew. Well done to everyone involved.

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